MAYFIELD GIN BOTANICALS


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JUNIPER BERRIES

i. Juniper berries are the primary botanical of all gins. The Juniper gives our gin the traditional character as well as some body to the product along with green, pine, woody and spice notes. 

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SUSSEX HOP

ii.  Our variety of hop was found growing wild in a local Sussex hedgerow before it was cultivated by award winning hop farmer Andrew Hoad. This variety brings a unique floral note and some sweet bitterness supported by the citrus, giving some fresh and zesty notes.

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ORANGE PEEL

iii. Orange peel and segments are often used as botanicals in gin, both fresh and dry, due to the distinctive citrus notes. We use dried orange peel as a botanical to add freshness to our blend and to create a unique citrus note to balance with the lemon peel.

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LEMON PEEL

iv. Another strong citrus botanical is dried lemon peel; working with the orange peel, we use this to add further complexity to the citrus notes but also to bring a slight bitterness to the finished liquid. 


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CORIANDER

v. Coriander seed is another one of our eight carefully tested botanicals; we found it enhances the fresh and zesty notes from the Sussex Hop. Coriander seed is hugely important within the gin industry and is actually the second most commonly used botanical after juniper berries.

 

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LIQUORICE

vi. This sweet and woody botanical has been used a sugar alternative for centuries, however don't confuse this with liquorice sweets...this botanical brings out a unique woody taste and works extremely well with Angelica root, creating that distinct dry, earthy taste. 

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ANGELICA

vii. Angelica is a commonly used botanical throughout the history of gin; its root is normally used but a number of distillers will use the seeds and sometimes even the flower as a botanical. To create Mayfield Gin we used the root of Angelica as we find it brings an earthy and dry taste.

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ORRIS

viii. Orris roots take a long time to prepare before they can be used as a botanical. The roots take a few years to grow to a point of harvest, and they are then picked and dried for many years before being ground into a fine powder. Known for their unique floral, sweet smell Orris roots are not only used to fix the aroma but also to bind the scents of other botanicals.